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20121201
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Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)
the world's first true world war. his attack on the french in the western pennsylvania wilderness grew into a global conflict lasting seven years, involve england, franch, austria, russia, prussia, and dozen other nations fighting for control over colonies in north america, africa, asia, and the seas in between. the seven years war changed the map of the world shifting national borders in europe, in africa, in india, and elsewhere. it leveled thousands of towns and villages in europe. killed or maimed more than a million soldiers and civilians, and bankrupted a dozen nations including england and france. remember, it started in britain's north american colonies, and the british government and british people naturally thought british subjects in british north america should share the costs of the war with their fellow citizens in britain. in fact, the government raised property taxes so high in britain that farmers rioted in protest and demanded that americans pay their fair share of the war. in 17 # 64, the british government extended to the colonies a stamp tax that everyone in britai
in the wilderness represent a majority of rank-and-file voters. the first that i alluded to that many on the right don't understand that properly understood gay-rights are compatible with fundamental principles and the essence of the libertarian philosophy is one of louis and let live people are concerned with unalienable rights. the government does that give those rights depended on your religion, economic class, a gender, or theoretically your sexual orientation. that is the way it is supposed to be. some libertarians already get that who have a special obligation to te
with nowhere to go. they were getting themselves ready to spend the night out in the wilderness. they do have cell phones with them. at this point they have not been able to connect until somehow they were able to make a phone call. believe it or not, a helicopter came to rescue them. >> to tell us more about the ordeal via skype "right this minute" we have ryan and lee ann. >> how come you guys got lost. >> we took what we not was a trail and ended in a canyon. >> we decided to hid down another canyon. that's where we came to an impasse, 200 foot drop. >> hills climbing were falling apart. it wasn't safe for us to keep moving forward. >> i've got to imagine you guys were getting pretty tired throughout this whole thing. did you have any food on you? >> fruit snacks and water. we had a little beef jerky with us. >> we had supplies. >> the funny thing was, we were prepared. we had ropes, food and water. the only thing i think we missed having was a little gps. we always kind of prepare for the worst but i guess not the absolute worst. >> how were you finally able to make a call and get a call
himself he went to the mountains or into the wilderness or out to the seashore and the great numbers of people in need always followed. tired and drained as he was, he looked on them with compassion. anoint all your people, lord, all those who minister to you as they minister to one another especially this week as they minister to the body, mind and spirit, to the whole community of sandy hook and newtown, a model for the nation, a model for the world. and we thank you for the world support, calling, e-mailing, texting their love and their commitment to be with us. use them, lord, take the passion that each one has and transform it totally, completely into your spirit of compassion. and we ask this all, amen, amen. >> newtown is a place that loves children above all. families move to newtown because we are a caring and loving community. we are also a place that has great pride in our schools, pride that propel it is students in those schools with their outstanding teachers and administrators to high achievement and great personal worth. the horror that was visited upon our sandy hook
version with gene wilder. >> that won seven oscars. >> the new is kind of creepy. >> johnny depp. >> what are did a stranger break down your door and give you for christmas? >> that's creepy. >> a kindle, a nook, an ipad? the man who ran the fcc on this thing we call the internet was born. the claims are a click away. maybe more than a click, but i think you get the drift. sometimes what we suffer from is bigger than we think ... like the flu. with aches, fever and chills- the flu's a really big deal. so why treat it like it's a little cold? there's something that works differently than over-the-counter remedies. prescription tamiflu attacks the flu virus at its source. so don't wait. call your doctor right away. tamiflu is prescription medicine for treating the flu in adults and children one year and older whose flu symptoms started within the last two days. before taking tamiflu tell your doctor if you're pregnant, nursing. have serious health conditions, or take other medicines. if you develop an allergic reaction, a severe rash, or signs of unusual behavior, stop taking tamiflu and ca
of order" and tlc's "breaking amish" have also focused on the wilder side of amish life. >> it a controversial concept, and reality feeds on controversy. it's outrageous. it's mysterious. it's unexpected. >> reporter: the network's website acknowledges most of the show is re-enactments, but according to levi, all the stories are the god's honest truth. linsey davis, abc news, new york. >> hope you caught that last word re-enactment. so you're not actually watching it. but they insist the stories are true. but you're not actually watching it unfold. >> it's reality, it's rob's reality with lebanon levi in your household, isn't it? >> that's what i'm talking about. now we're talking. >> who are you paying for a hit? who are you taking out? >> taking out willis, clearly. he's talking trash about the giants/saints game. >> i would just like an italian sausage, please. did you see the sign? i'm hungry. >>> when we -- when we come back, he's back in "the skinny." >> coming up on "world news now." ♪ >>> willis is back. can you tell? >>> willis is back. can you tell? here we g
, but not these particular people. and, in fact, the gossip was much wilder than the reality. he had a--it was said that he built the lying-in hospital in new york to take care of all the pregnancies that he was responsible. c-span: lying-in? >> guest: lying-in is a maternity hospital. we don't use that term anymore, although in boston it's still called the boston lying-in. he did actually build that hospital, but there was a less-lurid explanation. his best friend and physician was a man named james w. markoe, who was an obstetrician, and he wanted to build a hospital that would give up-to-date, first-class care to poor women who couldn't afford it. and morgan gave them $1 million to build the hospital and gave $100,000 to it for the rest of his life, which is not what we think of about j.p. morgan, that he was helping poor women have children under the best possible circumstances. c-span: did you spend 15 years on this one subject? >> guest: on j. p. morgan? c-span: yes. c-span: yes. >> guest: yes. but it isn't one subject, it's about 30. c-span: but this one book. >> guest: yes, this one book took me 15
about the romney campaign. fred wilder asks i wonder if lynn sweet is a cubs or white sox fan. inquiring minds want to know. >> you're on the spot. >> i'm going to try to make this -- >> bill: don't straddle the fence. >> i'm going to tell you i went back to the cubs once "the chicago tribune" sold them. so my allegiance once "the tribune" bought them many years ago and i was in washington. the nats weren't here yet. it was the os. nats were the nats which still have a prime place in my heart but once "the tribune" company bought the cubs, i could go back. once they sold the cubs -- >> bill: you could go back to the cubs. i think that makes sense. >> i had to and i could not -- somebody might say why not go to the white sox. i will quickly tell you the answer. many years ago the white sox did a deal in springfield illinois, the capital where they got -- i thought it was under the radar deal to get funding for their new stadium. and i don't like under the radar deals so i couldn't go to them because that wa
, there's clearly some immediate still a gap issues. you hear it in wilders, engineers, and we should be focused on that. third and perhaps most importantly, the long-term issue, which is really more, since we're talking about the future -- it is less of the current skill set and more of a supply-side issue. we should believe that if we have a large enough supply of skilled workers in the field of dreams notion that if we have the degree of skilled workers, it will help location of jobs to come here and we will be more of a magnet for the high skilled jobs of the future. i think that when we are looking at this, though, we should in our policy solutions make sure we are defining policies right said that we are having the right solutions. sometimes when people say "skill gaps, close to what they're talking about the absolute top of the top engineers and physicians. those people we talk about helping to address right now with high skilled immigration, others are talking about the supply of stem workers in our country -- science, technology, engineering, and mathematical workers and our
's not afraid to be a voice in the wilderness. and all too often, we don't agree with dennis. but we always understood where his passion comes from. and it comes from his deep faith and the fact that he realy believes in america just as the rest of us do. but on a personal note, dennis has become a good friend of mine. we share a deep conviction about obesity in our nation and ways to conquer it. and who knows, maybe on the outside, we will work together to try to find solutions to that. to steve austria, who just stood at this podium. i got to know steve in the state legislature. while we didn't really work together on bill well, actually went to arizona to watch ohio state win its national championship and it was there that i realy got to know him and his wife on a personal level. it was there he shared with me his dream to one day serve in this congress. i'm so glad he was able to let that dream come true. to my good friend steve latourette. when you come as a special election you don't get this orientation that people get when they come as a class. you get elected and you're thrown on t
was country has not had before. let me mention an even wilder category, and i will divide these into three legal lifestyle and professional categories. many of us focus on health care economics, we talk about hair rate disclosure. the medicare data is accessible. it is kind of shocking that for years we didn't even really understand how dialysis company, major industries like that made money. we need to amend the federal patent law to amend fraud. the federal government is the fastest player in the country and that's great, but it also leads to fraudulent payments sometimes. we probably need to update the definition of disability. it hasn't been updated since the 1950s. also, cost reimbursement as a means to getting things under control. it is amazing how almost every state enjoys the medicaid system, not to medicaid beneficiaries, but to dauphin. the federal employees health benefits program. the competition was held. how many people know that blue cross blue shield has gotten a $3 billion from the government every year since 1986? the blues and only the blues. how is this fair? other thi
the wilderness from coast to coast, in recent decades the u.s. has systematically failed to invest in the modern rail system. i thank president obama for making high-speed rail a priority. instead of developing energy efficient mass transit, we have allowed our rail system to deteriorate. we're not just lagging, we're not even trying to innovate. that's just not the american way. as a resident of knight, i fully understand the value of access to high-speed rail service along the southeast corridor. it is the busiest rail line in the united states, and it is the only amtrak segment that runs an operating surplus. it is making a profit. of all the places in our nation high-speed rail makes most sense along the northeast corridor which features the most congested road, the densest population and the most interconnected cities, and it had the ridership to make a profit for the investment in this rail system. from washington to boston, the amtrak stations are located right in the city centers making them more accessible to business travelers and the airports. the northeast region also has the densest
american ingenuity brought rail service through the wilderness, from coast to coast, in the kit -- recent decades, the u.s. has failed to invest in the modern fail -- modern system. instead of developing energy efficient mass transit, we have allowed our rail systems to deteriorate. we are not just lagging. we are not even trying to innovate. that is not the american way. i fully understand the tremendous value of access to high-speed passenger rail service along the northeast corridor. it is the busiest rail line in the united states and it is the only amtrak segment that runs a surplus. is making a profit. of all of the places in our nation, high-speed rail makes most sense along the northeast corridor, which features the most congested road, the densest population, and it has the writer -- ridership to make a profit. from washington to boston, the amtrak stations are located right in city centers. the north east region also has the densest population in the country. 20% of the nation's entire population lived in just this 2% of our land area and our great country. 70% of all chronicall
should return to play. >> thank you, tom for wilderness foreign and obviously to bob who is that the science and discussion forward dramatically because one of the things we all know is we can't not do nothing or anything. see how many negatives are put in there to make a positive. we have to do something. as a clinician that these kids and families and our clinics in seeing the major education deficit on the fields today in all sports frankly, but also seeing the outcomes. some of the things that raise talking about in terms of understanding forces is really important and we just completed some work in developing measures they are using so we can understand their cognitive symptom kinds of effects of these to kids. i think that's very, very important outcome to what we need to link up with the games. from the perspective -- actually was at the aspen institute this summer, where u.s. nabobs question about, should we be eliminating football -- tackling a football before the age of 14. at that point i couldn't speak, although we did speak that night. one of the things i sai
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)